The freedom of retirement involves choices

Which direction do you choose?
photo courtesy of Derek Bruff, Flickr.com.

What Do You See as Beauty in the  Freedom of Retirement?

As I consider the many things I have learned from people who attended my recent workshops, I think that one of the most important thoughts that came up again and again is the beauty of the freedom of retirement. Many attendees expressed the pleasure of the element of choice that retirement allows us to have. They delight in the fact that now they are able to create their own goals and explore new activities.

With retirement comes the wisdom to know our own minds

The freedom of retirement comes from our wisdom to know what has special meaning for us and, for the most part, freedom to make the time to commit to those goals. The conflict in this freedom is fitting all those things that have special meaning to us into our days.

I often hear retired people say there just aren’t enough hours in the day.  Because I am frequently one of those people making that comment, I appreciate the yin and yang in the statement. The happy side for me is that I am actively involved in things I love doing and have the freedom to choose my activities. The harder part is that the quantity of what I want to do can cause overwhelming conflict. Deciphering what is important on a particular day requires discipline and good schedules.

How do you use your freedom of retirement?

When I am writing I get lost in the process and feel perfectly content, but I can do the same when I’m walking the beach.The friction comes when I emerge from an engrossing activity. That’s when I realize I never accomplished what I had intended to do that day.

Some retirees have created a bucket list and enjoy celebrating the completion of each goal on the list. Others follow a strict regime every day or week. I admire both groups for their discipline and commitment to what they have chosen to do. However, I seem to be unable to do that since new and exciting opportunities continue to appeal.

Today I thought it would be interesting to ask you what you do to gain control of your time? How do you decide your day’s plan? How disciplined are you? Do you enjoy the random feeling of going from one thing to another as the mood strikes?

If you have the magic answer—or something close to it—please share it in the comment section below. Your ideas will benefit many other retirees.

We’re looking forward to your comments about freedom in retirement in the section below  — or maybe your comments and Likes on Facebook or Twitter.