How Do You View Your Quality of Life in Retirement?

 

Jason Lewis is a personal trainer specializing in helping the senior population. His dedication to this community blossomed when he became the primary caretaker for his ailing mother. He now spends a good deal of time thinking about senior wellness. Jason’s request to post an article on Survive, moved me for I could sense his care and concern. Although you may be aware of the advice in the article, I think it never hurts to be reminded. 

I hope you enjoy his article—and perhaps check out Jason’s website for more helpful ideas. Although I am not a fan of lifting weights, his article persuaded me to possibly give it a try. Please share your thoughts on the article below. I’d love to know if you find it helpful.   Thanks

Age has no barrier in quality of life in retirement

Age has no barrier in quality of life in retirement

Want to assure your quality of life in retirement?

Worldwide, the United States ranked eighth on a Global AgeWatch Index from 2013 gauging the well-being of elderly citizens. At the same time, the wealth inequality gap between seniors is widening. As of 2015, there were 40 million seniors living in the United States. By 2050, that figure is projected to soar to 89 million. Meanwhile, one out of every six elderly citizens subsists below the federal poverty line. Compared to our counterparts in other wealthy countries, older Americans are less able to access state-of-the-art healthcare. As a result, taking control of our own physical and mental health is essential.

Drink Water

One of the best things you can do for your health is to drink enough water every day. As every child in school is taught, up to 60 percent of the adult human body is water. A few benefits of drinking enough water include healthier skin, easier digestion, stronger bones and joints, improved blood circulation. sharper focus and concentration are also tremendous benefits. Men are supposed to drink 15 cups of water a day. Eleven cups per day provide the right amount or women. To keep hydrated, designate a cup you keep with you at all times. Keep it filled with water, and drink it throughout the day.

Wear Sunscreen

Skin disease affects more than 85 million Americans. Among seniors, some of the most common dermatological conditions include dry skin, bruising, shingles, and skin cancer. Some of these are relatively harmless. Others indicate the possible onset of other health problems, such as obesity, diabetes, malnutrition, and heart and liver disease. That’s why it’s important to put on sunscreen. Without it, you could be leaving yourself vulnerable to wrinkles, scarring, sunspots, or ruptured blood vessels. During the summer months (or all year in hot climates) ultraviolet rays are strongest between 10 AM-3 PM. Avoid staying out in the sun during those times. 

Get Plenty of Rest

Sleep is so essential to our health that we almost don’t even think about it. We often think of sleeping as a blank space wedged in between life. However, many cultures equate the dream world in sleep with the hidden life of the mind. If nothing else, keep in mind that, without sleep, our mental health will plummet. Sleep regulates our metabolism and helps soothe our physical pain. It can also reboot our brains if we are fatigued or overanxious. Researchers have found that problems sleeping could contribute to psychiatric disorders such as ADHD, depression, or bipolar disorder. Be sure to catch 7-9 hours of zzz’s per night.

Don’t Skip Breakfast: A long, leisurely breakfast can improve your quality of life in retirement

We consider it a truism, at least in American society, that breakfast is the most important meal of the day. Nutritionists recommend that we eat breakfast within two hours of waking up. They also recommend that the calorie total for your breakfast shouldn’t exceed 30 percent of your guideline daily allowance (GDA). Breakfast boosts your mental performance, kick-starts your energy levels and contributes beneficially to your long-term health. This is especially vital for seniors, who often face more health risks than younger people. Good foods to eat in the morning are nuts, eggs, coffee, berries, oatmeal, green tea, and Greek yogurt.

Keeping yourself healthy in your senior years isn’t complicated. It does, however, take thought and the application of good habits. Eating well, keeping hydrated, getting enough rest, and protecting your skin from harmful rays are great practices. They will help you live your best life in this exciting new chapter.

What will you do for your quality of life n retirement?

Image via Unsplash

 

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